EFFECTS OF TRAVEL TIME AND COST ON THE FREQUENCY AND STRUCTURE OF AUTOMOBILE TRAVEL

Data from the Washington, D.C., area transportation survey were used to test three hypotheses concerning the effects of travel time and automobile operating cost on the frequency of nonwork automobile travel and the demand for multidestination automobile travel by households without access to transit for nonwork travel. The hypotheses are that (a) increases in travel time and automobile operating cost cause reductions in the frequency of nonwork automobile driver travel; (b) these reductions in travel frequency are compensated by increases in the average number of nonwork destinations visited per trip; and (c) reductions in travel frequency cause reductions in the frequency of automobile driver visits to nonwork destinations. Travel time was found to have a substantial effect on the frequency of nonwork automobile driver travel by the households under consideration. Households for which travel times are low have travel frequencies that are 13 to 48 percent greater than the travel frequences of households for which travel times are high. Automobile operating cost was found not to have a statistically significant effect on the frequency of nonwork automobile driver travel. The reduction in travel frequency associated with increases in travel time are not compensated by increases in the average number of destinations visited per trip. Instead, the frequency of automobile driver visits to certain nonwork destinations-- notably nonshop, nonwork destinations-is reduced. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 1-5
  • Monograph Title: Perception and values in travel demand
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00145322
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309025613
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Feb 16 1977 12:00AM