INFORMATION IN A TWO-ROUTE NETWORK WITH RECURRENT AND NON-RECURRENT CONGESTION. IN: BEHAVIORAL AND NETWORK IMPACTS OF DRIVER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

An emerging issues for transportation planners is the behavioral effects of providing information to travelers. Information provision is promoted as capable of reducing delay due to congestions and improving the choices individuals make. For example, if a commuter knows that some unanticipated incident has severely reduced capacity on his or her normal route they would presumably make a decision to seek an alternative. The implications on aggregate traffic systems, especially as increasing numbers of travelers have access to reliable information. The results of this paper suggest that further investigation of the impacts of information on system-wide characteristics should be pursued. For example, the type of information and how it is delivered could influence traveler response. The results presented here offer intriguing suggestions that off-setting behavioral responses can confound policies to increase transportation efficiency, especially when efficiency is narrowly focused on improving travel times. Other elements of travel cost, such as scheduling costs, must be considered in assessing policy options.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Ashgate Publishing Company

    110 Cherry Street, Suite 3-1
    Burlington, VT  United States  05401-3818
  • Authors:
    • Noland, R B
  • Publication Date: 1999

Language

  • English

Media Info

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00794234
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 1840145064
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 28 2000 12:00AM