FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND EXHAUST OPACITY FROM HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLES

Diesel particulate matter (PM) is a significant contributor to ambient air PM sub(10) and PM sub(2.5) particulate levels. Recent literature argues that submicron diesel PM is a pulmonary health hazard. However, it is difficult to attribute PM emissions to specific operating modes of a diesel engine. Snap-acceleration tests generally identify PM associated with rapid transient operating conditions, but not with high load. This paper describes efforts to quantify the origin of PM during transient engine operation in which continuous opacity measurements were made while the vehicles were operated over transient driving cycles on a chassis dynamometer. Several manufacturers' diesel engines were tested. Continuous opacity measurements, integrated over the driving cycle, were compared to total integrated PM mass. The trucks were also subjected to repeat snap-acceleration tests, and PM was collected for a composite of these tests. A relationship between continuous CO emissions and continuous opacity was noted. In identifying the level of PM emissions in transient diesel engine operation, it is suggested that CO emissions may prove to be a useful indicator and may be used to apportion total PM on a continuous basis over a transient cycle.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Air & Waste Management Association

    One Gateway Center, 3rd Floor, 420 Fort Duquesne Boulevard
    Pittsburgh, PA  United States  15222
  • Authors:
    • Clark, N N
    • Jarrett, R P
    • Atkinson, C M
  • Publication Date: 1999-9

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00798749
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 18 2000 12:00AM