PENETRATION OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS INTO A HOME FROM AN M85-FUELED VEHICLE PARKED IN AN ATTACHED GARAGE

The use of both oxygenated fuels in CO nonattainment areas and reformulated gasoline in ozone nonattainment areas has been mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Methanol has been proposed as an alternative fuel for CO nonattainment areas and its use could increase indoor methanol inhalation exposure resulting from methanol-fueled vehicles parked in residential garages. Indoor air concentrations of methanol, benzene, and toluene were measured in a residential home with an attached garage. The effects of vehicle emission control devices; home heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) fans; ambient air, garage, and fuel tank temperatures; and wind speed were examined. The disconnection of a charcoal canister hose, simulating a spent evaporative emission control device, resulted in elevated benzene, toluene, and methanol concentrations in the garage and attached home. Higher fuel tank temperatures resulted in higher benzene and toluene concentrations in the garage, but not methanol. The concentrations for all compounds in the garage and of benzene and toluene in the adjacent room were lower when the HVAC fan was on than when it was off, while concentrations of all 3 compounds in the house were higher; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Results indicate that the portion of the population that parks cars in garages attached to homes will experience increased methanol exposures if methanol is used as an automative fuel.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Air & Waste Management Association

    One Gateway Center, 3rd Floor, 420 Fort Duquesne Boulevard
    Pittsburgh, PA  United States  15222
  • Authors:
    • Tsai, P-Y
    • Weisel, C P
  • Publication Date: 2000-3

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00798700
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 11 2000 12:00AM