RAPID URBAN GROWTH, LAND-USE CHANGES AND AIR POLLUTION IN SANTIAGO, CHILE

This paper contributes to an understanding of the topoclimatic and environmental geography of the basin where Santiago--one of the most polluted South American cities--is located. First, land use change is analyzed by looking at the climatic transformation caused by the rapid transition from natural semiarid surface to urban areas. Next, seasonal weather and daily cycles of slope winds and the available ventilation are described, trying to relate those patterns with spatial distribution of air pollution. A combination of meteorological, geographical, and cultural factors are provided to explain the extreme air pollution including: permanent subsidence inversion layers; Santiago's location in a closed basin surrounded by mountains; and the high concentration of population in the urban area (40% of national total), industries (70% of national total), and motor vehicles, which are the main sources of smog. Urban transport is based on a large and growing number of buses (diesel) and private cars. The natural semiarid deforested soils and slopes also contribute to air pollution. Other climatic features are discussed. At this time, there is no consideration of these topoclimatic and environmental features of the city in urban planning.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Elsevier

    The Boulevard, Langford Lane
    Kidlington, Oxford  United Kingdom  OX5 1GB
  • Authors:
    • Romero, H
    • Ihl, M
    • Rivera, A
    • Zalazar, P
    • Azocar, P
  • Publication Date: 1999-10

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00798719
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 13 2000 12:00AM