NEW YORK CITY'S SOCIOECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, LAND USE AND TRAVEL PATTERNS

New York City's transportation system is shaped primarily by the fact that the density of human activity results in travel levels well in excess of the capacity of the automobile-dominated street and highway network. As a result, rapid transit and commuter railroads form the backbone of the transit system, with buses used for local distribution and miscellaneous tripmaking unserved by the rail system. However, the rail system has not grown to accommodate increases or changes in tripmaking patterns, such that both the rail system and the street and highway system are overloaded. Maximum density is in the central business district (CBD), with non-CBD areas in New York City and some suburban areas also experiencing significant in traffic congestion. This paper provides an overview of socioeconomic conditions, land use, and travel patterns of metropolitan New York City, and concludes by discussing transport/transit system policy implications.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 368-380

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00797712
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0784404984
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 28 2000 12:00AM