INTERPRETIVE TESTING

A large proportion of structural testing relates to establishing the level of confidence which a client should have in a structure with respect to its long-term performance. A wide range of usually well-defined tests, including those based on standards, is available to testing consultants. What is not defined is the judgement which the consultant uses to interpret and analyse the results of such tests. This paper describes four groups of tests, and focuses on some of the traps which wait for the unwary consultant when interpreting their results. Quality-control tests include strength control, constituent control, workability control, corrosion protection, striking times, and curing. Non-destructive or semi-destructive tests, most often adopted to determine the level of confidence in the structure, are strength assessment, integrity, and vulnerability to corrosion. The following tests are most often used to determine the current state of a structure, when it is suspected that changes have been occurring: corrosion risk, attrition, and serviceability. Dramatic progress is being made in developing monitoring techniques, such as distress, stress condition, and flexural movement, as cheap, compact electronic measuring devices appear. Finally, some comments are made on the repair of concrete. For the covering abstract see ITRD E105613.

  • Corporate Authors:

    BRITISH PARKING ASSOCIATION

    17 THE CROFT, CHISWELL GREEN
    ST ALBANS, HERTFORDSHIRE  United Kingdom  AL2 3AR
  • Authors:
    • KINNEAR, R G
  • Publication Date: 1987

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00796515
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Aug 2 2000 12:00AM