VIGILANCE AND SIMULATED NIGHT DRIVING

This paper describes an investigation of the relationships between vigilance, performance on a simulated driving task, and physiological measures of arousal. Changes in performance on the vigilance task occurred which were like those frequently reported for vigilance tasks carried out alone, but changes characteristic of vigilance tasks with divided attention were not found. A marked decline in physiological arousal was not directly related to changes in either the vigilance or driving performance. It is suggested that a curvilinear relationship best explains the data, where both high and low arousal may lead to poor performance.(a) /TRRL/

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Taylor & Francis

    4 Park Square, Milton Park
    Abingdon,   United Kingdom  OX14 4RN
  • Authors:
    • Boadle, J
  • Publication Date: 1976-3

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00142428
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Analytic
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 19 1977 12:00AM