STATE REGULATION IN THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH ECONOMY: ANOTHER LOOK AT CARRIERS RATES. IN: ROAD TRANSPORT IN THE HORSE-DRAWN ERA

In 1691 Parliament passed an Act which required local Justices of the Peace at the next years Easter General Quarter Sessions, and annually thereafter, to asses and rate the price of all land carriage of goods conveyed within their areas of jurisdiction. Combination among carriers and wagoners, it was alleged, had driven up carriage rates to excessive levels, to the great injury of trade. Although the precise origins of this measure are obscure, there was nothing especially novel in either of the two main principles incorporated in it. Several elements of road transport, weights, movements and charges, had been subject to a measure of both local and central government regulation for some time: an attempts to control prices by the device of magistrates assessments were part of an even longer established strand of policy. This paper looks into the polices and principals of land carriage, land carriage rates, and the restraints but upon land carriage to help contain the costs.

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  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Originally published in Journal of Transport History, 3rd series, vol. VI, no. 2 (1985) pp. 18-36.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Ashgate Publishing Company

    110 Cherry Street, Suite 3-1
    Burlington, VT  United States  05401-3818
  • Authors:
    • Turnbull, G L
  • Publication Date: 1996

Language

  • English

Media Info

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00794144
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 1859283004
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 2 2000 12:00AM