LOWER SPEEDS SPEARHEAD DRIVE FOR NEW ROAD CASUALTY CUT BUT COUNCILS MUST TAKE THE LEAD

This article reviews the long-awaited road safety strategy for Great Britain published in March 2000. It examines the background to the setting of new casualty reduction targets, how the UK Government thinks that they will be achieved, and whether it is taking enough of a lead to satisfy road safety professionals and campaigners. The strategy aims to cut road deaths and serious injuries by 40% from their respective current annual levels of 3500 and 40,000 during the next ten years. It will use a variety of measures, covering: (1) child safety; (2) driver training and testing; (3) driver impairment through drink and drugs; (4) infrastructure measures; (5) speed limits and speed reduction; (6) vehicle design; (7) motorcyclists, cyclists, pedestrians, and horse riders; (8) law enforcement; and (9) safety promotion through publicity and advertising. The Government sees speed reduction as the heart of its strategy, and wishes speeding to become as socially unacceptable by 2010 as drink driving is now. The reason for the focus on speed is that Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) research has shown clearly the link between accidents and speed on various road types. The TRL contributed to the new strategy and its speed policy. The article discusses comments on the report by representatives of several road safety organisations.

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  • Authors:
    • FLOOD, A
  • Publication Date: 2000-3-16

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 10-11
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00793755
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jun 15 2000 12:00AM