BRITISH WATERWAYS: THE NEW CANAL AGE

This feature describes various aspects of the current revival of canals in the UK. For the first time in decades, British Waterways (BW) engineers feel that they are starting to win the battle to make Britain's 3200km canal network a safe resource that will be available every day. A 1999 Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR) policy document released BW from Treasury budgetary restrictions. BW now has the option to take a share in canalside developments, and use their revenues to invest in the network. This has already enabled BW to start clearing its backlog of maintenance and repairs fairly fast. BW also has several opportunities from public-private partnerships (PPPs) with developers. The Millennium Link project for restoring Scotland's two main lowland canals, the Union and the Forth & Clyde, now seems likely to be completed on time, despite starting three years late. 121 structures along the route are being restored, including 39 locks and 60 bridges, and property developers are already showing interest. Restoration work on the Kennet & Avon Canal has now reached the impressive Caen Hill flight of 16 locks in Devizes. Britain's longest canal tunnel, under the Pennines, has now been reopened. Future BW projects will recreate routes, facilities, and excitement on the canals.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    EMAP CONSTRUCT LIMITED

    151 ROSEBERY AVENUE
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  EC1R 4QX
  • Authors:
    • WHITELAW, J
    • Hayward, D
    • LOVELACE, N
  • Publication Date: 2000-2-17

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: I-XV
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00790466
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Apr 11 2000 12:00AM