LONG DISTANCE DRIVING AND SELF-INDUCED SLEEP DEPRIVATION AMONG AUTOMOBILE DRIVERS

The aim of this paper was to evaluate the sleep hygiene and prevalence of sleep deprivation among a large sample of automobile drivers. Participants consisted of 2196 randomly stopped automobile drivers at toll booths in 2 French cities of whom 91% agreed to participate in the sample (mean age 43 years). All subjects completed a validated questionnaire on sleep/wake habits during the year. After answering the questionnaire, subjects completed a graphic travel and sleep log of the 3 days preceding the interview. 50% of drivers decreased their total sleep in the 24 hours before the interview compared with their regular self-reported sleep time. 12.5% presented a sleep debt > than 180 minutes, and 2.7% presented a sleep debt > 300 minutes. Being young, commuting to work, driving long distances, starting the trip at night, being a "night" person or a long sleeper during the week, and sleeping in on the weekend were risk factors significantly associated with sleep debt. Results of the study highlight variables that are frequently associated with sleep-related accidents.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    American Sleep Disorders Association

    c/o Allen PressBox 1897
    Lawrence, KS  United States  66044
  • Authors:
    • Philip, P
    • Taillard, J
    • Guilleminault, C
    • Quera Salva, M A
    • Bioulac, B
    • Ohayon, M
  • Publication Date: 1999-6-15

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 475-480
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00792621
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 18 2000 12:00AM