BRITAIN'S PRIVATISED RAILWAYS AIM FOR SECURE STATIONS AND TRAINS

Since British railways were privatised, there has been more emphasis on security at stations and on trains. Efforts are being made to prevent potential trouble-makers from reaching the railway; video recording is a deterrent to offenders and can provide convincing evidence in law courts. The Connex rail company, which includes services through a deprived area of south London, has appointed its own Head of Security, a former senior police officer D Hynes. Because 95% of rail offenders travel without a ticket, Hynes sees the key to making customers feel safe on rail journeys as being achieved by controlling access. For this reason, Connex has already invested treet14M in security gates, and hopes to have 30 stations gated by the end of 1999. Connex has also recruited more ticket inspectors, and retained a private security firm to guard the gates and maintain security elsewhere on the system. British rail companies are now enthusiastically adopting closed-circuit television (CCTV) technology. London's main line stations are now protected by CCTV, and operators are now extending the use of CCTV to trains as well as stations and car parks; on-train CCTV can strongly deter the scratching of train windows. The Government has initiated the Secure Stations Scheme in partnership with British Transport Police and Crime Concern.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    RUSSELL PUBLISHING LTD

    4 BOURLET CLOSE
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  W1P 7PJ
  • Authors:
    • ABBOTT, J
  • Publication Date: 1999

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 49-51
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00788413
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Mar 3 2000 12:00AM