FATE AND EFFECTS OF OIL POLLUTANTS IN EXTREMELY COLD MARINE ENVIRONMENT. DECEMBER 1976

Oil biodegradation in Arctic coastal marine waters was modelled using a flow through system incubated in situ. Rates of natural oil degradation were very slow. Addition of nutrients increased degradative losses. Biodegradation did not result in major changes in the relative concentrations of hydrocarbons in crude oil during one summer's incubation. Oil incubated in situ under sea ice showed almost no degradative losses due to chemical or biological weathering during one month's incubation. Low concentrations of soluble/dispersed oil were found to result in sublethal changes in the movement and feeding of Arctic amphipods. Lethality of amphipods exposed to a soluble/dispersed oil was concentration dependent. Microbial populations in a lake contaminated by a MOGAS spillage changed in parallel with the movement of the gasoline and appear to be useful as an indication of hydrocarbon contamination. Microorganisms indigenous to the contaiminated lake were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and nutrient addition was shown to stimulate degradative losses.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Louisville University

    Department of Biology
    Louisville, KY  USA  40208
  • Authors:
    • Atlas, R M
  • Publication Date: 1976-12-31

Media Info

  • Pagination: 39 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00149776
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Office of Naval Research
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Annual Report No. 4
  • Contract Numbers: N00014-76-C-00400
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 27 1977 12:00AM