USER'S GUIDE FOR ATMOSPHERIC CARBON MONOXIDE TRANSPORT MODEL

In the winter months of Fairbanks, Alaska, a highly stable air temperature inversion creates high levels of carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. As an aid to understanding this problem, a CO transport computer model has been created which provides a useful tool when used in conjunction with other measurement and analytic studies of traffic, meteorology, emissions control, zoning, and parking management. The model is completely documented and illustrated with several examples. Named ACOSP (Atmospheric CO Simulation Program), it predicts expected CO concentrations within a specific geographic area for a defined set of CO sources. At the present time, the model is programmed to consider automobile emissions as the major CO source and may include estimates of stationary sources. The model is coded for computer solution in the FORTRAN programming language and uses the finite-element method of numerical solution of the basic convective-diffusion equations. Although it has a potential for real-time analysis and control, at the present time the model will be most valuable for investigating and understanding the physical processes which are responsible for high CO levels and for testing remedial control measures at high speed and low cost. /FHWA/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Prepared in cooperation with DOT, Federal Highway Administration and sponsored by Alaska Department of Highways.
  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Alaska, Fairbanks

    Water Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering
    Fairbanks, AK  USA  99775
  • Authors:
    • Carlson, R F
    • Norton, W
  • Publication Date: 1976-6-30

Media Info

  • Pagination: 157 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00149624
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Federal Highway Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FHWA-AK-76-IWR76 Final Rpt.
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Apr 27 1977 12:00AM