ESTIMATES OF THE LOW-LEVEL WIND SHEAR AND TURBULENCE IN THE VICINITY OF KENNEDY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ON 24 JUNE 1975

A study was conducted to estimate the type of wind and turbulence distributions which may have existed at the time of the crash of Eastern Airlines Flight 66 while attempting to land. A number of different wind and turbulence profiles are predicted for the site and date of the crash. The morning and mid-afternoon predictions are in reasonably good agreement with magnitude and direction as reported by the weather observer. Although precise predictions cannot be made during the passage of the thunderstorm which coincides with the time of the accident, a number of different profiles which might exist under or in the vicinity of a thunderstorm are presented. The profile that is most probable predicts the mean headwind shear over 100 m (300 feet) altitude change and the average fluctuations about the mean headwind distribution. This combination of means and fluctuations leads to a reasonable probability that the instantaneous headwind shear would equal the maximum value reported in the flight recorder data. (Author)

  • Corporate Authors:

    Aeronautical Research Associates of Princeton

    50 Washington Road, P.O. Box 2229
    Princeton, NJ  USA  08540
  • Authors:
    • Lewellen, W S
    • Williamson, G G
  • Publication Date: 1976-10

Media Info

  • Pagination: 48 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00146626
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NASA-CR-2751
  • Contract Numbers: NAS8-31380
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 16 1977 12:00AM