THE DETERMINATION OF THE PHYSICAL CHEMICAL, AND METALLURGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STEELS FURNISHED FROM TYPICAL HIGHWAY BRIDGES

Structural members from four different highway bridges were studied in terms of their chemical, physical, and mechanical properties, and these properties were related to evidence of deterioration or potential failure mechanisms in the structures. The steels were generally satisfactory in terms of the properties normally specified by the ASTM for structural parts. Microstructural quality of the steels was satisfactory and residual stress levels were negligible. However, all of the steels exhibited a tendency toward brittle, catastrophic failure during impact, drop-weight, and fracture toughness testing. This behavior was particularly evident at the lowest test temperature (-30 deg F). However, for steels having high phosphorus contents, some indications of brittle behavior were evident even at room temperature. In some instances, corrosion had caused appreciable thinning of the structure. The suitability of doubling plates as a repair method for this problem was evaluated. Crevice corrosion and corrosion-cracking were other observed modes of deterioration.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by DOT and FHWA.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Massachusetts Materials Research, Incorporated

    55 Millbrook Street
    Worcester, MA  USA  01606

    Federal Highway Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  USA  20590
  • Authors:
    • Wolff, A K
    • Martin, A D
  • Publication Date: 1973-6

Media Info

  • Pagination: 103 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00142911
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Federal Highway Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FHWA-RD-74- 4 Final Rpt., FCP 35F2-12
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-FH-11-7860
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Dec 15 1988 12:00AM