AN OCCURRENCE AND DISTRIBUTION SURVEY OF EXPANSIVE MATERIALS IN THE UNITED STATES BY PHYSIOGRAPHIC AREAS

The report concludes a study of physiographic areas within the continental United States which contain sources of potentially expansive materials. Following the definition of the physiographic provinces, generalized maps were developed which give a subjective indication of the occurrence and distribution of potentially expansive materials. Narrative descriptions which include lithology, geologic age, stratigraphic association, and mineralogy of the potentially expansive geologic units are included to complement the maps. The information within the report is designed to provide additional working knowledge of expansive materials to forewarn soils and pavement design engineers of impending problems. The most troublesome expansive materials consist of argillaceous sediments, shales, or less frequently occurring residual soils of the Mesozoic age or younger which have undergone minor modification by either deep burial or tectonism. Although montmorillonite may occur in several geologic environmets, its presence in marine sediments is most common and contributes to widespread occurrence of expansive materials, notably in the Great Plains and Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains Physiographic Provinces.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by DOT and FHWA.
  • Corporate Authors:

    U.S. Army Waterways Experiment Station

    Soils and Pavement Laboratory
    Vicksburg, MS  United States  39180
  • Authors:
    • Patrick, D M
    • Snethen, D R
  • Publication Date: 1976-1

Media Info

  • Pagination: 73 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00142841
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FHWA-RD-76- 82 Intrm Rpt., FCP 34D1-132
  • Files: NTIS, TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 15 1977 12:00AM