INFLUENCES OF ALCOHOL ON EMERGENCY CONTROL-REACTION TIMES AND BRAKE PRESSURE MODULATION DURING AUTOMOBILE DRIVING

This study was conducted to examine the influences of alcohol on steering and braking reaction times, and on brake pressure modulation during a driving task simulating a passing maneuver. Sixteen paid, male volunteers between the ages of 21 and 34 served as subjects. The driver either completed a "passing" maneuver, or "aborted" the maneuver on a cue from headlights mounted either on the hood or through the rearview mirror of his car. Blood alcohol concentration (90 mg %) averaging below the 100 mg % suggested by the federal government as the presumptive level of impairment caused a small but statistically reliable increase in control-response times. In addition, it was shown that alcohol effects extent beyond response time and affect the manner in which the controls (i.e., brakes) are actually used such that, whether as a compensation for perceived increases in response times or decreases in control-use sensitivity, the shape of brake pressure function is changed to show a decrease in rise time from the onset of brake pressure to the point in time of maximum brake pressure produced. /MSA/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Project title: Infleunces of Alcohol upon Driving Behavior in an Instrumented Car. Paper presented at the 16th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors Society, held during October 17-19, 1972.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Human Factors Society

    1134 Montana
    Santa Monica, CA  USA  90403
  • Authors:
    • Huntley, M S
    • Kirk, R S
  • Publication Date: 1972-10

Media Info

  • Pagination: 80 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00142016
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 31 1977 12:00AM