THE EFFECTS OF DRIVING DEMAND AND ROADWAY ENVIRONMENT ON PERIPHERAL VISUAL DETECTIONS

Peripheral vision is frequently regarded as being of significant importance in driving. To date, however, little study has been made of peripheral visual performance in the road situation as the driving task load is altered. A series of on-road experiments are reported here which investigate peripheral visual detections in both normal traffic and closed-road test locations using near-threshold light stimuli placed at near (30 deg.) and far (70 deg.) angles within the vehicle. The overall results indicated that increases in both the difficulty of the driving task and the complexity of the background visual scene degraded the detection rate of the visual signals. Furthermore, decrements were observed at all peripheral angles tested. The possible implications of these findings for the driving task and the design of the road environment are discussed. /Author/TRRL/

  • Record URL:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Proceedings of 8th Conference, University of Western Australia, Perth.
  • Corporate Authors:

    ARRB Group Ltd.

    Vermont South, Victoria  Australia 

    Australian Road Research Board

    P.O. Box 156
    Nunawading, Victoria 3131,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • Lee, P N
    • Triggs, T J
  • Conference:
  • Publication Date: 1976

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 7-12
  • Serial:
    • Volume: 8
    • Issue Number: 1

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00164213
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: May 18 1978 12:00AM