CORROSION AND BIOFOULING CONTROL IN DESIGN OF AN OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION FACILITY

Biofouling and corrosion are the two most critical aspects of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). They control the efficiency and longevity of the facility, respectively. Maximum efficiency and longevity are necessary if the plant is to achieve a positive net energy output over that necessary to build and maintain it. Most other problems facing OTEC can be circumvented except corrosion and biofouling. Failure to achieve satisfactory solutions to these problems will result in the failure of the entire project. The oceanographic variables necessary to define the environment to which an OTEC facility will be exposed are discussed along with the effects of each variable. Possible corrosion problems associated with the hull and cold water pipe systems and the heat exchangers are analyzed along with possible methods of corrosion control. The available literature on biofouling is reviewed and critiqued. A discussion of basic marine bacteriology is included along with the oceanic parameters useful in prediction of biofouling. Potential biofouling problems and solutions are discussed as related to the external surfaces, internal piping, and heat exchangers in OTEC.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Department of Ocean Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue
    Cambridge, MA  USA  02139
  • Authors:
    • Smith Jr, S W
  • Publication Date: 1977-8-19

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00167718
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Ms Thesis
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 27 1977 12:00AM