AIR QUALITY AND CENTER CITY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT. (ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS AND THE URBAN ECONOMY)

One way to reduce automobile-generated air pollution is to encourage core city employees to live closer to their jobs. This study was undertaken to determine the existing air quality of six 1974-1975 EPA Air Quality Control Regions (AQCRs) where adequate center city and suburban monitoring of pollutants was available. The five pollutants measured were: suspended particulates; sulfur dioxide; carbon monoxide; ozone/oxidants; and nitrogen dioxide. A series of comparisons of actual measures of air quality in the center city and suburban locations were made by means of an overall air quality index incorporating the five air pollutants. These comparisons show that center cities more frequently have superior overall air quality. From a limited point of view, this analysis establishes the desirability of downtown residential development.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Prepared in cooperation with Chicago Univ., Ill. Center for Urban Studies.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy and Environmental Systems Division, 9700 S Cass Avenue
    Argonne, IL  USA  60439

    University of Illinois, Chicago

    Center for Urban Studies
    Chicago, IL  USA  60680

    National Science Foundation

    1800 G Street, NW
    Washington, DC  USA  20550
  • Authors:
    • Santini, D J
  • Publication Date: 1976-7

Media Info

  • Pagination: 13 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00169624
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NSF/RA-760526
  • Contract Numbers: NSF-AG-352,, NSF-GI-32989-A2
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 14 1978 12:00AM