ENGINEERING BEHAVIOR OF PAVEMENT MATERIALS: STATE OF THE ART

This report reviews the engineering behavior of pavement materials with respect to highway and aircraft loadings and environmental conditions. The materials covered are bituminous mixtures, portland cement concrete, granular materials, chemically stabilized soils, and fine-grained soils. Basic properties of each are discussed. For bituminous mixtures, emphasis is placed on the characteristics of permanent deformation, fatigue, and rheological properties and the application to pavement design of accumulative damage theory based on Miner's hypothesis. Discussions are presented on the development of fatigue criteria from laboratory fatigue tests and design curves. For portland cement concrete, concrete strengths determined by various tests are discussed. Test procedures for determining the modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio are presented, together with discussion of factors affecting these values. The fatigue property of concrete and its relationship to pavement design are discussed. For granular materials, the resilient and plastic properties are discussed. Constitutive stress-strain relations proposed by many agencies are presented and compared. The relations consist of resilient, plastic, shear, and dynamic stresses and strains. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of granular materials, the validity of the superposition principle is applied to pavement design is discussed. For soil stabilization, the mechanisms of stabilization are explained, which included soil-cement, soil-lime, lime-fly ash, and lime-cement-fly ash and bituminous materials. Factors influencing engineering properties and properties of stabilized soils with respect to strength, modulus, and fatigue are discussed. For fine-grained subgrade soils, discussions also concentrate on the resilient and plastic properties. Constitutive stress-strain relations are presented with respect to resilient, static, viscoelastic, plastic, dynamic, and shear properties. The modulus of subgrade reaction used in rigid pavements and the nature of expansive soils in relation to rigid pavement design are discussed. /Author/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • This report may be helpful to those interested in the design of pavements for cargo terminals.
  • Corporate Authors:

    U.S. Army Waterways Experiment Station

    Soils and Pavement Laboratory
    Vicksburg, MS  USA  39180

    Council of Planning Librarians

    P.O. Box 229
    Monticello, IL  USA  61856
  • Authors:
    • Chou, Y T
  • Publication Date: 1977-2

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 409 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00167832
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FAA-RD-77-37 Final Rpt.
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-FA73WAI-377
  • Files: NTIS, TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Mar 7 1978 12:00AM