THE EFFECTS OF RANGE VERSUS NON-RANGE DRIVER TRAINING ON THE ACCIDENT AND CONVICTION FREQUENCIES OF YOUNG DRIVERS

The sample consisted of 2,057 high school students from five California high schools who were assigned randomly either to a traditional driver training program or to an experimental program utilizing a driving range. Aspects of their performance during driver training were measured, as well as performance on tests required for driver licensing and the number of days between training and licensing. In addition, Department of Motor Vehicles files supplied information on their accident and conviction records within the year following the beginning of driver training. Results showed that nonrange students performed significantly better on the following training variables: knowledge posttest, simulator score, and driver course grade. There were no significant differences between range and nonrange students on driver licensing test scores or in the amount of time spent in becoming licensed. However, range students had fewer total accidents than nonrange students in the year following the beginning of training.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored in part by National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, D.C. Prepared in cooperation with San Juan Unified School District, Carmichael, Calif.
  • Corporate Authors:

    California Department of Motor Vehicles

    P.O. Box 11828, 2415 1st Avenue
    Sacramento, CA  USA  95813

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  USA  20590
  • Authors:
    • Dreyer, D
    • JANKE, M
  • Publication Date: 1977-5

Media Info

  • Pagination: 58 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00167356
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: CAL-DMV-RSS-77-58
  • Files: NTIS, USDOT, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Dec 8 2002 12:00AM