EXAMINATION OF SOME IMPLICIT ASSUMPTIONS OF NOISE IMPACT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

Implicit in the existing techniques for assessing the impact of transportation noise are several assumptions that warrant explicit examiniation. The authors of this paper use data collected in southern Ontario to examine three assumptions, expressed as testable hypotheses, that deal with the relationship between the subjective rating of specific noise sources and the rating of the overall level of neighborhood noise, the strength of this relationship as a function of the number of disturbing noises present, and the relationship between specific noise-source ratings and the total number of disturbing noises. In testing each assumption, a major hypothesis and alternative hypotheses are proposed and supporting explanations are suggested. The principal basis of the hypothesis testing is to use nonparametric correlation analysis. The results show a significant positive relationship between the rating of specific sources and the overall noise rating,a tendency in the case of certain transportation-noise sources for this relationship to become stronger as the number of disturbing noises present increases, and a significant positive relationship between the rating of specific noises and the total number of disturbing noises. The major conclusion is that the results tend to support the implicit assumptions of existing procedures for assessing the impact of transportation noise. At the same time, they indicate the need to develop techniques that more closely relate to specific noise sources and that take into account the number of disturbing noises present. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 37-41
  • Monograph Title: Management of transportation and environmental review functions
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00155990
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309025737
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 15 1977 12:00AM