THE ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY SYSTEM

The signing of the National Highway System (NHS) Designation Act of 1995 by the president on November 28, 1995, meant an additional influx of $5.4 billion into the federal-aid highway program targeted to the NHS. While this influx of funds provides increased mobility and safety resulting from a higher quality highway system, it also provides economic benefits in the form of national productivity and employment growth. Many crucial questions remain concerning the contribution of public capital, specifically highway infrastructure investment, to economic vitality and competitiveness. It is clear that, at the national level, the reliable movement of freight on the transportation network assists U.S. businesses to compete in the international market. Further research will establish, measure, and articulate the linkages between transportation investment and broader economic objectives to provide a better understanding of the relationships between the transportation network and aspects of economic development and international competitiveness. Applying current estimates to the $5.4 billion invested in NHS indicates that the employment impacts of NHS equal more than 225,000 full-time equivalent jobs.

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  • English

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  • Accession Number: 00781729
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jan 17 2000 12:00AM