THE CONTRIBUTION OF FOUR LANE HIGHWAY INVESTMENTS TO EMPLOYMENT GROWTH IN RURAL SOUTH CAROLINA 1970-89: QUASI-EXPERIMENTATION

Quasi-experimental tests suggest that there are strong effects of new four lane highways on the ability of rural areas to attract new employment opportunities to their part of South Carolina. Some places are better situated to take advantage of the highway additions than others. It appears that regions that grew faster in the past and accumulated some agglomeration advantages and those that had higher per capita incomes and employment rates continue to benefit most--in terms of added employment in new firms--as highway investments are made. Statistical issues remain and data improvements are needed prior to estimation of more formal econometric models of firm location and regional growth. It is suspected that transportation improvements in rural South Carolina will benefit only a subset of all rural areas--those that have the other pre-conditions for growth in place. A process is under way of developing a continuous measure of Z region rurality using a geographic information system. Travel times to urban centers are computed given the four lane system in place by 1970. The new four lanes are added to the system in the 1970s--then in the 1980s--and travel times recomputed. This process gives both an initial period (1970) perspective on regional isolation and a view as to how the new four lanes have changed the level of isolation or rurality over time.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 1-24

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00780254
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: SRIEG-53 Publication No.1, SRDC Publication No. 146
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 14 1999 12:00AM