STAINLESS STEEL CORROSION IN SPENT OIL SHALE

The authors of this article warn infrastructure owners that they should be aware of the possibility of corrosion of all grades of steel, when they are placed in potentially corrosive environments. An investigation by the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) in Scotland has shown that, under certain conditions, stainless steel elements can be severely corroded. Potentially corrosive environments include natural fills, waste materials, and industrial by-products. The TRL advises that there is an urgent need to identify and check all situations where a specific structure could be corroded. The TRL investigation is focused around a retaining wall, built between December 1972 and May 1973 as part of the A901 trunk road improvements in Edinburgh. The wall was built from cruciform reinforced concrete panels with stainless steel reinforcing elements and burnt oil shale backfill. In February 1999, severe corrosion was found along a 50m long section of the wall, between 4.5m and 5.0m from the face, often leading to severing of the elements. Site investigations included an ongoing detailed line and level survey to monitor wall movement, and three test pits were dug to observe the nature and extent of the corrosion. The corrosion is highly localised and severe, but does not seem to be due to road salts or other agents.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    EMAP CONSTRUCT LIMITED

    151 ROSEBERY AVENUE
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  EC1R 4QX
  • Authors:
    • WINTER, M G
    • BUTLER, A M
  • Publication Date: 1999-9

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 28
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00779384
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Dec 7 1999 12:00AM