EFFECTS OF DEICING SALTS AND LEAD UPON TREES, SHRUBS AND SOILS IN CONNECTICUT

The effects of deicing salts and particulate lead were studied on twenty-eight species of trees and shrubs planted in 1968 and 1971 adjacent to a heavily travelled interstate roadway in central Connecticut. The soil on the same test site was also investigated for the accumulation of undesirable elements and their effect on its chemical and physical properties. Field observations, chemical analyses of plant tissues, tissue indices, and soils investigations all indicate that areas within 30 feet of the highway are unfavorable to the normal growth of many trees and shrubs. Consequently, trees and shrubs growing between 30 and 80 feet of the pavement were rated on their relative tolerance to roadside condition. The data support the thesis that on well-drained sites under Connecticut conditions, deicing salts are being removed annually from the root-zone soil about as fast as they are being added. The data also suggest that trapping of lead particulates by vegetation bordering highways apparently results in an increase of lead in the underlying surface soils. Foliage may be effective in protecting areas immediately beyond the vegetative border from lead (pb) fallout.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Prepared in cooperation with DOT, Federal Highway Administration.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Connecticut Department of Transportation

    Bureau of Planning and Research, 24 Wolcott Hill Road
    Wethersfield, CT  USA  06109
  • Authors:
    • Button, E F
    • Rubins, E J
    • Woodward, M A
    • Griffin, G F
  • Publication Date: 1977-1

Media Info

  • Pagination: 179 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00158125
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Federal Highway Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FHWA-CT-76-9 Final Rpt.
  • Contract Numbers: Ct. HPR-Study No 331
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Oct 13 1977 12:00AM