VERTICAL SHOCK AND VIBRATION

Shock forces resulting from over the road operation are seldom severe in the vertical plane, about 2 G maximum. During impact between two cars, there is a force couple due to differences in the horizontal level of the couplers, and the center of gravity of the cars. The coupling causes the cars to dip vertically downward at the striking end and to rise at the opposite end. Other causes of vertical shocks are; column loading due to angle of contact, eccentricity of load contact, strength of the sill, and body camber, all of which tend to force the cars out of vertical alignment. Relative vertical accelerations for various modes of transportation are shown. The vertical vibration of a standard freight car running over main line track in fair condition will seldom exceed 1 G. About 2 G's is the maximum vibration to be experienced anywhere on a railroad.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Railroad Environment: A Guide for Shippers and Railroad Personnel.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Penn Central Transportation Company

    Transportation Center, 6 Penn Center Plaza
    Philadelphia, PA  USA  19104

    Penn Central Transportation Company

    Transportation Center, 6 Penn Center Plaza
    Philadelphia, PA  USA  19104
  • Publication Date: 0

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 15-16
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00033345
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 7 1973 12:00AM