CHAPTER 23: THE DELFT BICYCLE NETWORK REVISITED. FROM THE GREENING OF URBAN TRANSPORT, EDITION 2.

After evaluating single bicycle routes inside and outside built-up areas in the 1970s, the Dutch Ministry of Transport initiated a demonstration project concerning an urban bicycle network in the 1980s. The town selected for this project was Delft (94,000 residents). The Delft bicycle network consists of: two large tunnels; three bridges; 3.3 km of new bicycle tracks; 2.6 km of streets that are bi-directional for cycles but one-way for cars; 10 km of new asphalt pavement. It was determined that in the long run the Delft bicycle network did not bring the benefits that were aimed for. Most of the short-term effects did not last. Traffic safety for cyclists improved only when measured in rates (chance), not in absolute figures. There was no structural growth in the number of bicycle trips, nor a decrease in car use. Thanks to this project, it became clear that a one-directional policy does not lead to a significant and lasting increase in bicycle use and a proportional decrease in car use.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Wiley (John) & Sons, Limited

    Baffins Lane
    Chichester, Sussex  England 
  • Authors:
    • Hartman, J
  • Publication Date: 1997

Language

  • English

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  • Accession Number: 00763844
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0471069931
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 26 1999 12:00AM