THE IMPORTANCE OF TECHNOLOGY MONITORING AND EXPERIMENTING: TOWARDS ANOTHER INNOVATION POLICY IN TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORT

HET BELANG VAN TECHNOLOGIEMONITORING EN EXPERIMENTEREN: NAAR EEN ANDER INNOVATIEBELEID IN VERKEER EN VERVOER

In this article the government role and the possibilities open to government for actively dealing with technological innovations, are considered. What are these innovations, how may their effectiveness be assessed, and how can society (consumer and industry) arrive at an effective supply and demand market balance where new innovation is concerned? A simple model is presented that is intended to provide a clearer understanding of the innovation process and of the ordering of the forces of players therein. It is explained where the government stands in all of this, and it is indicated what stance the government could take. Two major roles which are always, or at least should be, fulfilled are the role of technology as a monitor and as an experimenter. The innovations which predominantly optimise the current traffic and transport systems are also considered. Innovations that alter the structure of the traffic and transport system are examined. Two facets are important: the first facet to alleviate environmental and safety problems, particularly in the short term; and the second one to control the accessibility and congestion problem, notably in the long term. Conclusions are drawn on the lessons to be learnt from this where traffic and transport innovation processes are concerned. (A)

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    SAMSOM H.D. TJEENK WILLINK BV

    P O BOX 316
    ALPHEN AAN DEN RIJN,   Netherlands  2400 AH
  • Authors:
    • Rutten, B J C M
    • KORVER, W
    • ELZEN, B
  • Publication Date: 1998

Language

  • Dutch

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 191-211
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00764213
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Institute for Road Safety Research, SWOV
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: May 28 1999 12:00AM