COMPRESSIVE STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF NORMAL AND HIGH-STRENGTH CARBON-FIBER CONCRETE REINFORCED WITH STEEL SPIRALS

Carbon-fiber reinforced concrete was combined with traditional transverse steel reinforcement in the form of steel spirals in an attempt to increase the energy absorption and strength of the concrete under both monotonic and cyclic loading. The stress-strain relationship of concrete in compression in both unconfined and confined states was examined. The descending branch of the stress-strain curve was recorded to investigate the ductility of normal and high-strength fiber reinforced concrete confined with steel spirals. The experimental program consisted of testing 100 mm-by-200 mm concrete cylinders under compression at two different strength levels: normal (48 MPa) and high strength (75 MPa), reinforced with different percentages (volume fractions of 1.5%, 2%, and 3%) and lengths (7.5 mm, 20 mm, and 30 mm) of high-strength carbon fibers with an equivalent diameter 0.78 mm. These were then repeated with the addition of spiral reinforcement, 5 mm in diameter, with different pitches (25 mm and 50 mm). This study was carried out to evaluate the optimum combination of fibers and steel spirals to obtain the same level of fracture energy dissipation as that obtained by using only a high-volume percentage of spiral steel, which is generally used in real structures.

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  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00762899
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Contract Numbers: CMS-9601262, AMB96-0415, MAT97-1022
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 1 1999 12:00AM