AIRPORT ACCESS STUDY: IMPACT OF AIRPORT-ORIENTED VEHICLE TRIPS ON HIGHWAY FACILITIES

The highlights are presented of a study which was accomplished using existing urban transportation study data files and computer programs available from the Federal Highway Administration. Four urbanized areas were selected for the study: Birmingham, Alabama - Boston, Massachusetts - Louisville, Kentucky and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. For each selected area, two standard transportation planning files were obtained; that is, 1. A "link-data" file describing the characteristics of the highway network (link distance, speed, volume, capacity, etc.) 2. A "trip-record" file describing the characteristics of all trips made within the study area (trip origin, destination, mode, etc.) For each selected area the "link-data" file was used to build a computerized model of the highway network. The resulting "network description" was then used as input to an existing computer program to build minimum time paths from each node in the network to every other node. These minimum time paths or "trees" were then "skimmed" to obtain the traveltime between each pair of traffic analysis zones. The "trip record" file was processed to produce a matrix of zone-to-zone vehicle volumes. The resulting "trip table" was further processed to produce a summary of total vehicle trip-ends by traffic analysis zone. The total vehicle trip table was used in conjunction with the network and tree files to "load" total vehicle trips onto the highway network. The resulting "loaded network" was further processed to produce average daily, directional link volume and vehicle-mile information relative to total vehicle trips made within the study area. In addition, the total vehicle trip table and the skimmed tree files were used to generate a total vehicle trip length frequency distribution. The total vehicle, network and tree files were again used to load the highway network; however, this time only vehicle trips having an origin at the airport zone (this is the zone in which the airport was located) were loaded onto the highway network. The resulting loaded network was again further processed to produce average - daily directional link volume and vehicle trips having an origin at the airport. The term airport will refer to the zone in which the airport is located for the remainder of this report. Also, trip length frequency distribution information for vehicle trips having an origin at the airport was generated. The data generated as a result of the above process were then analyzed and subsequently summarized by five major categories: Trip, vehicle-mile, trip length, link and georgraphic orientation. A great deal of information relative to the characteristics of airport - oriented vehicle trips was produced as a result of this study. Much of these data are tabulated and presented in the results and appendix sections of this report.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Comsis Corporation

    8737 Colesville Road
    Silver Spring, MD  United States  20910
  • Publication Date: 1972-7

Media Info

  • Pagination: 42 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00155611
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Federal Aviation Administration
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Aug 15 1977 12:00AM