THE RISK COMPENSATION THEORY OF ACCIDENT CAUSATION AND ITS PRACTICAL CONSEQUENCES FOR ACCIDENT PREVENTION

No abstract provided.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Paper presented at the Osterreichische Gesellschaft for Unfallchirurgie, Annual Meeting, 7-9 October, 1976, Salsburg. 711A The purpose of the experiment was twofold: (1) to compare various secondary tasks on their sensitivity to driving under different conditions: downtown, in a residential area, on a two-lane highway, and on a four-lane highway, and (2) to verify the hypothesis that, despite variations in traffic conditions, a driver attempts to keep his level of mental load as constant as possible. After the drivers' responses had been analyzed per segment of one-eighth of a mile in each of the four road environments, they were reanalyzed in chunks of four-minute time units. Again subsidiary task performance was compared between the different traffic environments. As predicted, it was found that dual task performance scored on a temporal basis was much less variable between different roads and streets. In fact, analyses of variance produced a dramatically greater degree of significance for discriminati
  • Corporate Authors:

    Queen's University, Ontario

    Department of Psychology
    Kingston, Ontario  Canada  K7L 3N6
  • Authors:
    • Wilde, G J
  • Publication Date: 1976-10

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: 40 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00153858
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 28 1977 12:00AM