PERCEPTION OF ROAD RULES AND PRIORITIES AFTER EXPERIENCE WITH A COMPREHENSIVE INTERSECTION CONTROL PROGRAM

Stratified samples of 1,000 Melbourne area drivers were examined for perception of road rules and priorities and general orientation to the driving task at the beginning of a comprehensive intersection control program and again after it had been operating for approximately one year. The instrument used was a questionnaire which in part presented the respondent with a paper and pencil simulation of a long main road with frequent intersection conflicts and overtaking opportunities and with systematic variation of intersection controls. A comparison of "before" and "after" response distributions and profiles showed an increase in overall driver consensus in allocation of intersection priorities coupled with a conservative response to overtaking opportunities. There was some evidence also of a "main road driver" syndrome by which the expectation of priority tended to persist in situations, such as uncontrolled and "give-way-to-right" signed intersections, where such expectations were not always warranted. /Author/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by Victoria Road Safety and Traffic Authority, and the Australian Department of Transport.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Monash University

    Human Factor Groups, Wellington Road
    Clayton, Victoria 3168,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • McKelvey, R K
    • Mare, W K
    • Wisdom, P H
  • Publication Date: 1976-8

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 50 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00152379
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 31 1977 12:00AM