ACCIDENTS ON RURAL INTERSTATE AND PARKWAY ROADS AND THEIR RELATION TO PAVEMENT FRICTION

Friction measurements were made with a skid trailer at 70 mph (31 m/s) on 770 miles (1240 km) of rural, four-lane, controlled-access routes on Interstate and parkway systems in Kentucky. Each construction project was treated as a test section. Accident experience, friction measurements, and traffic volumes were obtained for each. Various relationships between wet-weather accidents and skid resistance were analyzed. Averaging methods were used to develop trends and minimize scatter. A moving average for progressively ordered sets of five test sections yielded more definite results. The expression of accident occurrence that correlated best with skid and slip resistance was wet- weather accidents per 100 million vehicle miles (161 million vehicle km). Accidents (at 70 mph (31 m/s)) increased greatly as skid numbers decreased from 27. Analysis of peak slip numbers and accident occurrences indicated similar trends.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 22-36
  • Monograph Title: Pavement surface properties and vehicle interaction
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00141414
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309024986
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Conf Paper
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Nov 3 1976 12:00AM