INTERLOCK PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

Technical monitoring of drivers with a breath alcohol ignition interface device (BAIID) is an effective measure against drink-driving, because it requires a driver of a car to blow a low-alcohol or alcohol-free breath sample before its ignition is possible. There is legislation supporting BAIID programmes in several states or provinces of the USA, Canada, and Australia. In 1991, the US National Highway Safety Traffic Administration (NHTSA) began a process to examine the elements of effective interlock programmes. The NHTSA guidelines were prepared, to identify certification issues, propose minimum model specifications, and indicate areas which need improvement and development. In the absence of field data, the guidelines were based on the certification testing experiences of various US states and the experience of installers. Some benefits, problems, and issues in using BAIIDs are examined. BAIIDs aim to remove driver motivation from the chain of preventive intervention. A driver who has a BAIID installed in his car is monitored each time he wants to drive it. For an offender motivated to comply, a BAIID can be educational and check unintended indiscretions. The chief disadvantage is that a drink-driving offender can too easily use a car without a BAIID. For the covering abstract, see IRRD 866577.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 1454-9
  • Monograph Title: ALCOHOL, DRUGS AND TRAFFIC SAFETY-T92. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00729780
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 3824901315
  • Files: ITRD, ATRI
  • Created Date: Dec 26 1996 12:00AM