A PARAMETER STUDY OF THE STRENGTHENING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS WITH BONDED COMPOSITES

Concrete structures deteriorate for various reasons and upgrading has been achieved for over twenty years by bonding steel plates using epoxy resins. The method has been applied mainly to bridges. Disadvantages of this method include transporting, handling and installing heavy plates and corrosion of plates. The use of composite materials overcomes these problems and provides equally satisfactory solutions. An experimental parameter study of the strengthening of reinforced concrete beams by bonded composite plates is presented. Plate geometry and applied load configuration are studied, revealing that bonded plates increase the ultimate capacity of beams, but reduce ductility. Ultimate capacities decreased with reducing ratios of plate width to thickness. Failure was always accompanied by concrete cover separation from internal reinforcement. Separated cover widths at plate ends were equal to beam widths for wide plates and plate widths for narrower plates. Increasing shear span/depth ratios resulted in improved ultimate capacities. Bonded plates are effective in carrying increased proportions of internal moment couples beyond yield of conventional reinforcement. Various plate end anchorages were also applied, revealing that anchorage delays failure by resisting plate separation. (A) For the covering abstract see IRRD 882313.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 400-8

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00729481
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 0-419-21210-8
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Dec 26 1996 12:00AM