PREFERENCE DIMENSIONS OF LONG-DISTANCE TRAVEL: THE CHOICE OF TRANSPORT MODE DISCLOSES YOUR PERSONALITY

The article summarises a report on the preference dimensions of long-distance travel by the Institute of Transport Economics, Norway. The data used in the project were based on telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1033 people in Norway. Most of the sample members were licenced drivers, aged between 18 and 67, who had made a trip over 100km during the last two years. Four different perceptions of travel time were used: (1) leisure time; (2) an interlude or 'time lock'; (3) limited time; and (4) dead time (void time). The perception of travel time was found to be linked to the rhythms of everyday life and the acceptance or rejection of travel operators' timetables. The choice of mode for a long-distance trip is correlated with personality or lifestyle. While travelling alone on long journeys, most men prefer to use a car, while women tend to prefer train travel. Factor analysis was used to identify the respondents' transport preference structures, whose disclosed dimensions were: (1) environmental awareness; (2) freedom and autonomy with a private car; (3) train comfort; (4) on-board services; (5) conspicuous transport consumption; (6) security; (7) price sensitivity; (8) privacy; and (9) bus comfort;

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00729186
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Dec 12 1996 12:00AM