COMPUTER ANIMATION

The concept of animation is introduced as a tool for presenting and representing an accident reconstruction. There is a widespread acceptance of drawings, plans, and photographs in law courts, because people can often understand pictorial illustrations better than verbal descriptions. The use of computer-generated video graphics for accident reconstruction has evolved as a natural progression from this, and is now firmly established in US courts. Such graphics allow the display and exploration of the critical features of speed, timing, visibility, reaction time, and design features relevant to an accident. This enables judges, magistrates, and jurors in court to 'see' what an expert witness has been describing, by viewing a dynamic representation of his evidence in real time, slow motion, or freeze-frame. Simulations of moving objects can be presented, and views of the same accident can be shown from different positions. The video graphics can also illustrate what-if scenarios, for example show what would have happened if a car in the accident had been travelling at a different speed. Computer animations can be generated direct from suitable computer files. In the UK, computer animations have not yet been presented in court, despite much positive interest from lawyers and insurance companies.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    METROPOLITAN POLICE FORENSIC SCIENCES LABORATORY

    109 LAMBETH ROAD
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  SE1 7LP
  • Authors:
    • ROLPH, S
  • Publication Date: 1996

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 30-2
  • Serial:
    • IMPACT (ITA1)
    • Volume: 5
    • Issue Number: 2
    • Publisher: METROPOLITAN POLICE FORENSIC SCIENCES LABORATORY
    • ISSN: 0959-4302

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00729179
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Dec 12 1996 12:00AM