THE FEDERAL EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY ACT OF 1908: PAST TIME FOR A CHANGE?

The Federal Employers' Liability Act of 1908 (FELA) is an injury compensation system which was originated with legislation in 1908 at a point when the railroad industry was considerably more dangerous than it is now. In order to get compensated under FELA, the worker has to demonstrate some negligence on the part of the employer. It is a comparative negligence standard -- the compensation can be reduced in proportion to the worker's negligence. The worker can seek compensation for pain and suffering, as well as for out-of-pocket expenses. The Transportation Research Board (TRB) performed a study on FELA, comparing it to workman's compensation, and this paper reports on the conclusions that resulted from the study. The TRB panel was specifically charged to make no recommendations.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Additional remarks were prepared and made by Ed Cot, Mike Babcock, and Frank Dooley. These proceedings, Volume 8 of the TRF 36th Annual Conference, were funded for publication by the UPS Foundation.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Transportation Research Forum

    11250-8 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 8
    Reston, VA  United States  20190
  • Authors:
    • Oster Jr, C V
  • Conference:
  • Publication Date: 1994

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00728796
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Volume 8
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 13 1996 12:00AM