A POLITICAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS OF BOSTON'S CENTRAL ARTERY/TUNNEL PROJECT

Conventional wisdom holds that the era of major downtown highway projects is over -- the victim of gridlocked local political systems, fiscal austerity, and ardent opposition from both neighborhoods and environmentalists. Historically, these forces were particularly strong in the Boston metropolitan area. Yet today -- at a cost of almost $10 billion -- Massachusetts is replacing Boston's existing elevated Central Artery with an underground highway and building a third harbor tunnel from the city's downtown to the region's major airport. This report documents how the region's political leaders developed and sustained a broad coalition in support of the project and analyzes this history to suggest important lessons about how to plan, finance, and manage a complex urban transportation project in an era of environmentalism, neighborhood activism, and fiscal austerity.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, University Transportation Centers Program.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Taubman Center for State and Local Government

    Kennedy School of Government, 79 JFK Street
    Cambridge, MA  United States  02138
  • Authors:
    • Luberoff, D
    • Altshuler, A
  • Publication Date: 1996-10

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 293 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00728819
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Final Report
  • Contract Numbers: DTRS95-60001
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 21 1996 12:00AM