THE PASSENGER TRAIN IN THE MOTOR AGE: CALIFORNIA'S RAIL AND BUS INDUSTRIES, 1910-1941

This book examines the demise of passenger trains and the rise of buses in California and demonstrates that railroad management's shortsighted response to the growing use of automobiles contributed to its own decline. After peaking about 1910, the use of intercity passenger trains rapidly gave way to the onslaught of the automobile. For the next three decades, railroad managers tried, but failed, to adapt the passenger train to the new competition. Although previous studies have suggested that regulation and a conspiracy between rail and bus management played a significant role in the decline of the industry, this book reaches a different conclusion. Focusing on the California operations of two major railroads and the largest intercity bus company in the United States, it is demonstrated that railroad management failed to accurately assess the demand for its service and the costs of providing it. Superior corporate planning within bus companies led to their success. Case files of regulatory commissions provided primary source material for this book.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • This publication is part of the Ohio State University Press Historical Perspectives on Business Enterprise Series.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Ohio State University Press

    1070 Carmack Road
    Columbus, OH  United States  43210-1002
  • Authors:
    • Thompson, G L
  • Publication Date: 1993

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: 265 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00728473
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0814206093
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 22 1996 12:00AM