STATE OF THE ART: LIMIT EQUILIBRIUM AND FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SLOPES

Great strides have been made in the area of static stability and deformation analysis over the past 25 years. Microcomputers have changed the computational aspects of slope stability analysis. Analyses are much more thorough, from a mechanics point of view, and more accurate than without computers. However, engineers still need more than a computer program to perform slope stability analyses. They must have a thorough mastery of soil mechanics and soil strength, a solid understanding of computer programs, and the ability and patience to test and judge the results of their analyses to avoid errors and misuse. Realistic analyses of deformations of slopes and embankments have only been possible for about 25 years. Development and adaptation of the finite-element method has made slope stability analyses possible. The principal requirement for attaining reasonably accurate and useful results from analyses is the suitable representation of the stress-strain behavior of the soils involved. The experience gained over the past 25 years--using the finite-element method on dams, embankments, and slopes--has provided valuable lessons regarding the advantages and limitations of this method for use in practical engineering problems.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 577-596
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00726121
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 26 1996 12:00AM