TEENAGERS USE THEIR SAFETY BELTS MORE BUT STILL NOT AS MUCH AS OLDER PEOPLE

Driver belt use among students attending Maryland high schools was higher in 1995 at four of five schools surveyed in both 1988 and 1995. However, belt use still remains too low among teenage drivers, and is even lower among teenage passengers. A strong relationship was found between driver and passenger safety belt use. In vehicles with both a driver and right front passenger, 70% of the passengers were belted if the driver buckled up. If the driver wasn't belted, only 22% of the passengers used their belts. Females were more likely to buckle up than males, with 74% of all female high school drivers and right front passengers using belts, compared with 57% of males. Also, safety belt use corresponded to each community's socioeconomic status - areas with high median household incomes had schools with high driver belt use rates and those with low incomes had schools with low safety belt use. Maryland has secondary belt law enforcement provisions, meaning another violation has to be detected before an officer can issue a citation for not using a belt. Primary enforcement of safety belt use laws would get more teenagers to buckle up. These results are reported by A.F. Williams el al. in "Variations in High School Safety Belt Use" (available from Insurance Institute for Highway Safety).

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00724915
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-042 187
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: Aug 20 1996 12:00AM