INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL FACTORS IMPINGING ON COLLISION AVOIDANCE ABILITIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR ACCIDENT RATES

Is the retinal periphery as capable of extracting time-to-contact information from an expanding image as the retinal center? To address this proposition, both male and female participants viewed a graphically generated scene which depicted one road approaching directly toward them and a second road approaching from a 40% angle to their left. A vehicle would approach the driver along either road traveling at one of three velocities and was removed while en route to the driver. Drivers were required to estimate when the approaching vehicle would have reached their position. The experiment employed a 2 x 2 x 3 design in which sex was a between-subject variable while trajectory and vehicle approach velocity within-subject variables. Results indicate the retinal periphery is less sensitive to time-to-contact information than the retinal center. In addition, it was found that vehicle approach velocity, viewing distance, and sex effect estimates of time-to-contact. The results of this study have strong implications for roadway designers who wish to decrease the amount of accidents at dangerous intersections or roadways.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures;
  • Pagination: p. 973-978

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00724826
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 27 1996 12:00AM