AIRLINE DEREGULATION, HUBBING AND THE IMPLICATIONS OF SUPERIOR ACCESSIBILITY FOR METROPOLITAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

This paper aims to show how restructuring in the USA's air transport sector has had very tangible effects on the wider space economy. It begins by discussing the US experience of deregulation and restructuring of the airline industry, and the significance of this process. It then considers the US air service since deregulation, with special reference to its geographical strategies and geographical implications. The rest of the paper is mostly devoted to the effects of the concentration of a smaller number of airlines around their hub airports. Aspects of this process that are considered include: (1) the effects of hubbing on regional accessibility; (2) the immediate economic significance of hub airports; (3) direct and indirect hub impacts and the relative size of hub impacts; (4) how far induced hub impacts provide an economic stimulus; (5) competition from cities to attract new hub operations; (6) the future for hub airlines; and (7) the role of regional airlines in maintaining airline service quality. After 15 years of operation in a deregulated environment, it now appears that the future development of air service patterns in the domestic US market will be driven by short-term changes in aircraft technology as well as longer-term demographic and economic changes. For the covering abstract see IRRD 879900.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: 27 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00724089
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 0-86050-286-4
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Aug 19 1996 12:00AM