INFLUENCE OF THE FRONTHOOD LENGTH FOR THE SAFETY OF PEDESTRIANS IN CAR ACCIDENTS AND DEMANDS TO THE SAFETY OF SMALL VEHICLES

This study investigates the influence of the length of the vehicle fronthood on the injury severity of pedestrians' head. The study reveals that with a short fronthood length an increase in head impact frequency to the windscreen occurs. The injury severity is mainly influenced by the collision speed. With short fronthood lengths, an earlier occurance of serious injuries is already established in collision speeds of up to 30 km/h. Therefore, it can be assumed that with an increase in the number of so-called "city vehicles', there will be a higher injury risk on the road for pedestrians. An increased injury risk will especially exist for persons with a body height above 170 cm. The study clearly shows that the established increased injury risk with short fronthoods is not based on the fronthood itself, but is more frequent even with pane impacts at lower speeds. Short fronthoods appear to be more sensible, provided that the adjoining pane region is modified. An integrated line of fronthood and windscreen pane with a pronounced inclination appear to be preferable. For the covering abstract of the conference see IRRD 879189.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 391-401

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00724083
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Institute for Road Safety Research, SWOV
  • ISBN: 1-56091-543-9
  • Files: ITRD, ATRI
  • Created Date: Aug 19 1996 12:00AM