EVOLUTION OF A MARINE TERMINAL: A CASE STUDY OF THE PORT OF HOUSTON'S FENTRESS BRACEWELL BARBOURS CUT CONTAINER TERMINAL

To survive in the competitive marine transportation industry, port terminals must adapt to changes in the business environment. This paper describes how the Port of Houston's Barbours Cut Terminal (BCT) has evolved during the past 22 years, becoming the premier container terminal on the U.S. Gulf Coast. BCT has evolved into a multiuser facility servicing 24 steamship lines. Projected volumes for 1994 were 450,000 20-ft equivalent units (TEUs). The terminal averages 30 container moves per gang per hour on vessels. Ship turnaround time is less than an hour with proper documentation. The terminal has five 1,000-ft container berths, and a sixth berth is scheduled for completion in early 1996. The terminal has 20 rubber-tired gantry and 10 wharf cranes. The terminal's 203 acres of marshaling area can accommodate more than 21,500 TEUs and 532 refrigerated units. Space is available for more than 4,000 wheeled units. Also available are a RO/RO platform, a LASH dock, two 100,000-sq ft transit sheds and 44 acres of RO/RO marshaling area. A rail ramp is located near the 55,000-sq ft container freight station. For trucks the terminal has 21 truck lanes and 12 scales. The original concept for BCT is still intact: to develop flexible and efficient facilities in time to meet market demands and to remain as cost conscious as possible. The ultimate goal is to provide customers with the best service for the lowest possible price.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 172-178
  • Monograph Title: INTERMODAL FREIGHT TERMINAL OF THE FUTURE
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723854
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jul 24 1996 12:00AM